Idiom of the Week: Runs in the Family

Image result for luke and darth vader

https://www.starwars.com/news/anakin-and-luke-skywalker-twin-journeys

Meaning: A hereditary health problem; expressed as “Something runs in someone’s family.”

Examples:

Baldness runs in my family. If you look at our family reunion photos you see a lot of shiny heads!

You should tell your doctor if heart disease runs in your family.

Diabetes runs in her family but luckily she doesn’t have it.

Pop Quiz:

If something runs in someone’s family, it….

A.  Is genetic.

B.  Isn’t genetic.

C.  All of the above.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

Continue reading

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Much, Many, A Lot Of – Which One Do I Use?

By Flunse (Patrick Geltinger) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=404343

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

 

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Hockey!

Last week some of our students and staff took a trip to New Jersey to watch a New Jersey Devils hockey game. Students got a tour of the arena, took in the game, and even got to watch zambonis at work. Here are some pics:

 

Click on “Continue reading” to find out what a “zamboni” is. Continue reading

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Bringing It All Back Home – POSTPONED!

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED!

University Settlement has been fighting, with a coalition of our Lower East Side neighbors for the return to public use of the Stanton Street Building which is currently closed because the NYC Parks Department uses the building for storage.

The northern end of the Sara D. Roosevelt Park (where the building is located) needs some TLC, and we think opening the Stanton Building to public programming for our little ones, youth, and elders is a great place to start.

The Parks Department has finally agreed to look for an alternate storage facility. So we are celebrating with our NYC Councilmember Margaret Chin, and other elected officials, this Thursday with a press conference. Join us!

 

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Hit the Road, Jack!

Here’s a song by Ray Charles using our latest Idiom of the Week – Enjoy!

Hit the Road, Jack
Ray Charles

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

 

Oh woman, oh woman, don’t treat me so mean

You’re the meanest old woman that I’ve ever seen

I guess if you say so

I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

Now baby, listen baby, don’t you treat me this way

‘Cause I’ll be back on my feet someday

Don’t care if you do, ’cause it’s understood

You ain’t got no money, you just ain’t no good

 

Well, I guess if you say so

I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more…

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Happy Year of the Pig!

Image result for lunar new year pig

https://pixabay.com/en/photos/happy%20pig/

From ChineseNewYear.net:

Pigs might not stand out in a crowd. But they are very realistic. Others may be all talk and no action. Pigs are the opposite.

Though not wasteful spenders, they will let themselves enjoy life. They love entertainment and will occasionally treat themselves. They are a bit materialistic, but this is motivation for them to work hard. Being able to hold solid objects in their hands gives them security.

They are energetic and are always enthusiastic, even for boring jobs. If given the chance, they will take positions of power and status. They believe that only those people have the right to speak, and that’s what they want.

Click here to read more.

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Idiom of the Week: Hit the Road

Image result for hit the road

Image via https://medium.com/kidslisten/hit-the-road-with-these-great-family-friendly-podcasts-26c6e95eb1bc

Meaning: Begin a journey.

Examples:

Are you ready to hit the road now?

Let’s hit the road. We are running late.

I will hit the road when I have enough time and money.

Pop Quiz:

What’s the opposite of hit the road?

A. Leave

B. Depart

C. Stay home

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

Continue reading

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