Tag Archives: english idioms

Eat Out of Someone’s Hand Revisited

Here are some images from the world wide web using our latest Idiom of the Week:

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Idiom of the Week: Eat Out of Someone’s Hand

Meaning: To be very obedient; to do everything someone wants.

Examples:

Even though my boss is tough and mean, with my smile, hard work, and flexible schedule in only three weeks, I had him eating out of my hand.

The new teacher had lots of children who were naughty, didn’t listen to her and screamed all day. But she brought cakes, candy and computer games and soon she had them eating out of her hand.

You’ll never get them to eat out of your hand with your lousy attitude!

 

Pop Quiz:

If someone is eating out of your hand….

A.  you have food in your hand.

B.  you don’t have to ask them twice to do you a favor.

C.  they constantly complain about you.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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Break the Ice Revisited

Here a nice ice breaker you can user at your next party or meeting – just click on the image for a larger view:

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Idiom of the Week: Break the Ice

Meaning: To make people comfortable or more talkative at the beginning of a party, meeting, or any other social gathering. The noun form is “ice breaker.”

Examples:

On the first day of class I always like to do something fun to break the ice.

He saw he needed to break the ice so he told a joke that got everyone laughing.

What should we do for an ice breaker at the new staff meeting?

 

Pop Quiz:

Which of the following are good ways to break the ice?

A.  Two minutes of silence.

B.  A test.

C.  A game in which people learn something interesting about each other.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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Ring a Bell Revisited

Here are some images from the web using our latest Idiom of the Week. Enjoy!

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Idiom of the Week: Ring a Bell

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/images/ic/1920x1080/p01grdfw.jpg

Meaning: To sound familiar; to remember something, but maybe not very well

Examples:

“Do you know Felipe Sanchez?” “The name rings a bell.”

“Don’t remember? Well, I’ll read some addresses and you tell me if any of them ring a bell.”

She asked me if I had ever studied past perfect tense and I told her it rang a bell.

 

Pop Quiz:

Which of following might ring a bell?

A. The keys to your apartment.

B. The name of a movie.

C. Your cell phone.

To see the correcting answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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Put Your Foot in Your Mouth Again

Here some images and quotes from the world wide web using our latest Idiom of the Week. Click on any image to view the gallery:

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