Tag Archives: grammar

Grammatically Speaking

A little grammar review is in order. Click on the picture below to test your knowledge of some grammar points. The test will provide the correct answer as well as an explanation as to why it is the correct answer. Good luck!

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Much, Many, or A Lot Of?

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

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Count Vs. Non-Count

Ready for some more grammar? Good.

This time we’re going to look at count and non-count nouns. Remember that nouns are people, places, or things.

Count nouns can be counted, which means you can also make them plural. Remember that plural means more than one. For example, the word “teacher.” Can you count teachers? Of course – one teacher, two teachers, three teachers, four teachers. The noun “teacher,” then, is a count noun.

Non-count nouns can’t be counted, and they’re almost always singular. Remember that singular means one. For example, the word “air.” Can you count air? Of course not – we never say one air, two airs, three airs, etc. So “air” is a non-count noun.

To learn more, watch the following video, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

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Much vs. Many vs. A Lot of

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

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Simple Present Vs. Present Progressive

Ready for more grammar? Good.

This time we’re going to look at simple present tense and present progressive (also called present continuous) tense.

We use simple present tense when we talk about something we usually do or always do or never do or sometimes do. For example:

I live in Brooklyn.

She always does her homework.

They don’t drink alcohol.

We use present progressive tense to describe something we’re doing right now, at this very moment. For example:

I’m using the computer right now.

She’s talking on the phone.

He isn’t sleeping. He’s watching TV.

But be careful – there are some verbs that we rarely or never use in the present progressive tense. These verbs describe a feeling or a way of thinking. For example:

I understand the situation.   (Not “I’m understanding the situation.”)

They believe what you say.   (Not “They’re believing what you say.”)

He wants a new bike.   (Not “He’s wanting a new bike.”)

Now watch these two videos. The first one is a clear explanation of the grammar, and the second one is a rather strange demonstration of the grammar.

After you finish watching, take the quiz to test your knowledge – and then you can write some sentences in simple present tense or present progressive tense (or both) by leaving a comment!

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Bored or Boring?

Time for some more grammar. This time, we’re looking at adjectives ending in -ed and -ing.

Adjectives describe nouns.

Many adjectives end in “ed” and “ing” – like bored and boring, excited and exciting, interesting and interested. But it’s sometimes confusing which form you should use.

Basically, you use adjectives ending in “ed” when describing how someone feels. So you should usually say “I’m bored” instead of “I’m boring,” “I’m confused” rather than “I’m confusing,” and “I’m tired,” not “I’m tiring.”

You use adjectives ending in “ing” when you describe something that causes the feeling. For example, “The movie was boring,” or “My English class is interesting,” or “The book was very exciting.”

Here’s a video which explains it further. After you watch the video, take the quiz to test your knowledge.

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Grammar Review: In, At, & On

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We use “in” for cities. states, countries, and rooms:

I live in New York City.

I live in New York State.

I live in the United States.

I’m in the bathroom.

We use “at” for places like work, home, school, or stores – and also for addresses.

I’m at work.

I’m at home.

I study English at University Settlement.

University Settlement is at 184 Eldridge Street.

I’m at Macy’s.

We use on for floors, islands, and streets:

I live on the second floor.

The Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island.

University Settlement is on Eldridge Street.

I live on 12th Avenue.

Watch this video to learn more, and afterwards take the quiz to test your understanding:

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