Tag Archives: idioms

Idiom of the Week: Kick the Bucket

Meaning: To die.

Examples: 

You’re still alive! I thought you kicked the bucket!

Julius Caesar kicked the bucket in 44 BC.

The polite way to say “kick the bucket” is “pass away.”

 

Pop Quiz:

If someone says, “I feel like I’m going to kick the bucket,” they feel…

A.  Pretty good.

B.  Terrible.

C.  Not so bad.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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Speak of the Devil & Lonely Revisited

We’re killing two birds with one stone here by giving you a song that uses our latest Idiom of the Week and our latest Awesome Adjective. Listen and read the lyrics below!:

“Speak Of The Devil”

by Chris Isaak

Speak of the devil
The devil appears
Waiting for someone
Been waiting for years
And it’s alright now
Yeah, I’m alright now

Watching her walking
Like watching a flame
Trying to forget her
Don’t mention her name
And I’m alright now
Yeah, I’m alright now

Lonely days without her
Nights that would not end
As long as I don’t think about her
I can still pretend
It’s alright

Speak of the devil
The devil appears
Been waiting for someone
Lonely for years
But I’m alright now
Yeah, I’m alright now
It’s alright
It’s alright

Speak of the devil

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Idiom of the Week: Speak of the Devil

Meaning: Said when you’re talking about someone or something and he or she or it suddenly appears. The complete expression is “Speak of the devil and he shall appear.”

Examples:

Speak of the devil! We were just talking about you!

“Did you hear about Thomas?” “Shh! Here he comes right now!” “Speak of the devil!”

“I wonder if it’s going to snow today.” “Look! It’s snowing!” “Speak of the devil…”

 

Pop Quiz:

When should you say “speak of the devil“?

A.  When the person you were talking about doesn’t appear.

B.  When the person you were talking about appears after an hour or so.

C.  When the person you were talking about appears right away.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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Ducks in a Row Revisited

Here are some images from the web using our latest Idiom of the Week. Enjoy!:

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Idiom of the Week: Ducks in a Row

Meaning: To be very organized and to plan carefully, often expressed as “He/she likes all his/her ducks in a row.”

Examples: 

She likes her ducks in a row and hates chaos.

“How would you describe yourself?” “I like all my ducks in a row.”

You need to have all your ducks in a row if you want to succeed.

 

Pop Quiz:

What’s the opposite of having your ducks in a row?

A.  Being neat.

B.  Being orderly.

C.  Being messy.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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All Ears Revisited

Here are some fun images from the web using our latest Idiom of the Week – just click on any of them for a larger view. Enjoy!

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Idiom of the Week: All Ears

Meaning: To be paying attention; to be listening carefully.

Example:

Go ahead and speak – I’m all ears.

The customer service representative said she was all ears when the customer told her he had a problem.

“Are you listening to me?” “Of course! I’m all ears!”

Pop Quiz:

What’s the opposite of all ears?

A.  Inattentive

B.  Focused

C.  Attentive

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

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